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wow a whole post, go me!

curi42 (6:42:25 PM): hmm i think there is an attitude where people make some choices, in effect about what values to have and about vast swathes of future choices. (and make most of these choices based on what they're supposed to do, etc)
curi42 (6:42:58 PM): then sort of coast along, being little more than a robot enacting these pre-decided things, and making trivial choices (what should i eat today?)
curi42 (6:43:13 PM): ok, technically, they still keep making big choices all the time, but it's so ingrained to make them one way, they never even notice
curi42 (6:43:42 PM): 2 points: A) telling them they must stop and think, could be rather disturbing
curi42 (6:44:04 PM): B) our view, where we are constantly making choices, could be rather foreign and not understandable
curi42 (6:44:05 PM): like
curi42 (6:44:50 PM): in relationships, ppl seem to think 'ok, i'm jack's gf now, so i'll do that' and the only real choices are 'keep going' and 'quit'. as long as it's keep-going mode they just coast coast coast.
curi42 (6:45:09 PM): whereas, a better view is, every day.....every hour, we must keep deciding what we want to do next, and next, and next. the future isn't set
curi42 (6:45:24 PM): under the second view, multiple friends becomes a non-issue
curi42 (6:45:51 PM): that sound good? should i change much b4 posting?
curi42 (6:46:17 PM): [mwahahaha, you can't read what I said here]
Other_Person (6:48:06 PM): seems ok, though it is perhaps too harsh a judgement on people
curi42 (6:48:25 PM): on ppl in general?
Other_Person (6:48:31 PM): yes
curi42 (6:48:39 PM): they don't do it WRT all things
Other_Person (6:49:00 PM): being conservative is a good policy in general, since the world is very complex and innovation is risky
Other_Person (6:49:24 PM): coasting = pejorative word for 'being conservative'
curi42 (6:49:43 PM): no
curi42 (6:49:53 PM): it's a perjorative word for not noticing ur making choices
curi42 (6:49:59 PM): being conservative *on purpose* is one thing
Other_Person (6:52:28 PM): ok
Other_Person (6:52:32 PM): well, say that too
curi42 (6:52:37 PM): k

Elliot Temple on October 12, 2003

Comments (9)

like "i want to be a doctor". (physician)

and they'll say it early in their life. like 5 years old.

and adults will ask them "what do you want to be when you grow up?" as if that's a good question. it isn't.

Anonymous at 6:30 PM on February 3, 2016 | #4827
why isn't it a good question to ask "what do you want to be when you grow up?"

Anonymous at 4:26 AM on February 5, 2016 | #4833
> why isn't it a good question to ask "what do you want to be when you grow up?"

This saying implicitly assumes that what the child might want to do now is worthless. His actions should be aimed at something he wants to do in the far future.

In addition, the saying assumes that it is possible to predict the growth of knowledge since otherwise saying "I will want to do X" doesn't make much sense.

Anonymous at 5:09 AM on February 5, 2016 | #4836
>> why isn't it a good question to ask "what do you want to be when you grow up?"
>
> This saying implicitly assumes that what the child might want to do now is worthless. His actions should be aimed at something he wants to do in the far future.

and what the child does now is worthless if it doesn't make the child any money.

the question "what do you want to be when you grow up" is really "how are you going to make money when you grow up?"

as a child has no obligation to support himself, but an adult has.

and people are identified by their jobs.

> In addition, the saying assumes that it is possible to predict the growth of knowledge since otherwise saying "I will want to do X" doesn't make much sense.

i don't think it assumes such a thing.

having plans for one's future makes sense. it doesn't mean you cannot change your mind on what you want to be when you grow up. if you want to become a lawyer there's hoops you can jump to be so.

adult life forces you to make money being something.

Anonymous at 7:35 AM on February 5, 2016 | #4844
> why isn't it a good question to ask "what do you want to be when you grow up?"

how the hell should a kid know that? don't ask them to make a prophecy.

it's an ok topic to discuss in a really tentative, speculative way. like what are some careers that sound neat to you? want to learn some stuff about them? that could be fun. but there should be no implication the kid will actually do this career or is actually picking a career to pursue now.

Anonymous at 11:01 AM on February 5, 2016 | #4849
> and what the child does now is worthless if it doesn't make the child any money.

wtf? stuff you don't get paid for is not all worthless.

for example, i haven't been paid for writing my blog. that doesn't make my blog worthless.

curi at 11:03 AM on February 5, 2016 | #4850
> for example, i haven't been paid for writing my blog. that doesn't make my blog worthless.

why do you think it's worthy if nobody pays you for it?
how do you measure worth?

is the blog all you do? no, or you'd be dead.
isn't what you do for money more worthy?

Anonymous at 4:27 PM on February 5, 2016 | #4871
>> why isn't it a good question to ask "what do you want to be when you grow up?"
>
> how the hell should a kid know that? don't ask them to make a prophecy.

this is not asking kids to make a prophecy, but to make a guess.

> it's an ok topic to discuss in a really tentative, speculative way. like what are some careers that sound neat to you? want to learn some stuff about them? that could be fun. but there should be no implication the kid will actually do this career or is actually picking a career to pursue now.

there is no such implication. i don't understand why you think there is.

Anonymous at 4:29 PM on February 5, 2016 | #4872
i think my blog is good. that's my judgement. i think it's your judgement too.

curi at 5:14 PM on February 5, 2016 | #4880

What do you think?

(This is a free speech zone!)